The Future of Sports Broadcasting: How Social Media will complement TV broadcasting

Kevin Larroyer / January 2, 2022

The Future of Sports Broadcasting

As discussed in the video podcast, sports fans are moving fast away from traditional cable cords and shifting towards OTT platforms (Perez, 2018). 63% of sports fans say they would be prepared to pay more than £10 per month for OTT platforms that broadcast live sports and highlights (Dixon, 2020). However, consumers still watch live sports on Tv, and the challenge for broadcasters is to keep fans engaged (Nielsen, 2019; Deutsch et al., 2021). In 2020, Grabyo survey revealed about the same number of sports fans consume sports on pay-tv (68%) and social media (66%) (Grabyo, 2020). Broadcast alone isn’t enough for sports fans (Valentine, 2019).

The video podcast examined the Gen Z and Millennials have disrupted the sports broadcast landscape. Additionally, blog 3 discussed that the development of augmented reality and virtual reality would influence overall fan satisfaction (Deloitte, 2019). Also, Deloitte Fan Engagement survey found that in the future, fans are looking to consume sports across devices and integrate AR, VR, social media, and gambling into their viewing experience (Deutsch et al., 2021). Finally, this blog will discuss how social media will play a significant role in completing rather than competing against TV broadcasts (Valentine, 2019).

Social Media

However, how social media can complement TV sports broadcasting? Social media offer so much for sports. For example, during a game, social media provides fans stats, communication with players and fans, opinion of other players, and education on sports (Levy, 2017). Social media have helped sports become even more popular as fans enjoy interacting with other fans or any sports actors via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook (Levy, 2017). Moreover, 41% of the young generation prefer to engage digitally while watching a game (Deutsch et al., 2021).

Another reason why social media complement TV broadcasting is because social media platforms break down the communication barriers between fans and sports actors (e.g., players) (Petersen-Wagner, 2020). Social media encourage fans to communicate and interact (Butterworth, 2014). Facebook and Twitter pages allow the fan to give their opinion about the team performance (Gantz & Lewis, 2014). On the other hand, social media enable athletes to communicate in an unfiltered manner with their fans to promote themselves or share information’s (Wallace et al., 2011; Hambrick, 2012). Because athletes who use social media increase the visibility and popularity of their sport and increase the market value of the sports leagues (Bowman & Cranmer, 2014). E.g., some athletes have more followers than the team they play for (Bowman & Cranmer, 2014).

Athletes draw attention from the public, and this attention can be leveraged (Arai et al., 2013; Carlson & Donovan, 2013). The interactivity and the proximity of social media directly benefit TV broadcasters and OTT platforms. Automatically, fans who follow players on social media will likely watch them perform on either pay-tv or OTT platforms—resulting in consumers sharing their experiences and opinions using social media platforms.

How do you value the role of social media in sports consumption? How social have changed the way you consume sports?

Leave your views or additional thoughts in the comment section.

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